Deirdre Griffin


A "Corpus" in Acoustic Ecology using two fundamentally different theoretical frameworks


The primary goal of this thesis is to contribute to the field of acoustic ecology. It explores the nature of sounds by focusing on the physical properties and its attributes outside its natural environment.
The methodological approach was to record a large number of carefully selected everyday sounds and evaluate these sounds by comparing both these different but related theoretical frameworks. A total of a 100 sounds were used for this experiment and 12 participants contributed in this study. By analyzing these listening methods we can see what listeners prioritized, what is focused on, and information that has been disregarded.

The results suggest the phenomenology in relation to sound classifications according to their perceptual characteristics. It focuses on participant's description of sound as it touches on something fundamental to sensory processes and perception, as it investigates the distal and proximal entities.

It proposes questions on how individuals perceive sounds in regards to its Sonification feedback, and it suggests direction for understanding everyday listening and the visualization of their own representation of these sounds. It informs both the design of auditory displays and further development in future technology.  

Deirdre Griffin